Reading is my ESCAPE from Reality!

“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” 

 

-- J.R.R. Tolkien, The Lord of the Rings

It's Thursday on Friday! Catch up on BookLikes know-how / BookLikes under maintenance note

Reblogged from BookLikes:

It's Friday but it feels like Thursday!

Due to technical difficulties our release post got delayed. Since it's possible to publish again, we wanted to let you know what's going on with the site.

 

As you may have noticed BookLikes was under maintenance for some time today and yesterday. Our team is still working on the site issues and some of the features are under review, therefore, you may experience some inconvenience while using them. We sincerely apologize for the temporary inconvenience. We're working on fixing all the problematic issues, including the Dashboard chronology.

 

In case of any questions or remarks, please mail Kate@booklikes.com and we'll be happy to help and support. 

 

In the meantime, please have a look at our previous posts where we shared the crucial tips for BookLikes bloggers. If you've missed out previous Thursday releases, here's your chance to catch up on some of them:

 

How to start a book blog

No matter whether you're a regular BookLikes visitor or a newbie, we hope you'll find these tips useful in your blogging adventure. Here's how to set up your book blog and make your first steps in the blogging community... read how to set up your book blog

 

 

6 ways to blog about books

Book blogging is awesome and it's even more fun if you can blog about books in different ways... read how BookLikes can help you blog about books in six different ways

 

 

7 tips how to write a book review

Book blogs are different but they do have one thing is common, they share book reviews. And this means you're letting us, the readers, enter into your heads. Which is great, we get to know your thoughts without the superpowers! Sometimes, though, some extra powers are needed to write a good book review.  We are curious what are your writing tips. Below we share several of ours plus several places on BookLikes to visit to add your reviews on BL... read how to write a book review on BookLikes

 

 

A-Z ways to arrange your bookshelf

Let's say it loud, a bookshelf in book lover's life isn't only a space to collect books. It's a space to show your reading personality, it's a place to praise your sweethearts. Your bookshelf is You. The way you arrange your bookshelf tells a lot about you. BookLikes bookshelf also offers a set of features which allows you to present your bookish personality with your book collection... read how to add books to your bookshelf on BookLikes

 

 

4 ways to give a shout out to a beloved title

If you're wondering how to praise a book and put it in the spotlight, the following BookLikes spots will come in handy... read how to highlight your favorite books on BookLikes

 

 

5 tips to show yourself as a professional reader, author, publisher

If you're a blogger, author or a publisher you can use your BookLikes book blog as an excellent companion to your other webpages and social media. Read five tips how to show off your brand with your BookLikes blog

 

 

How to add Facebook and Twitter widgets

No matter whether you are a writer, publisher or a book bloggers, it's important to present all possible information about your profession and links to your other webpages and other social platforms. Only then your readers will be able to look through your dossier and get to know you a little bit better. Recently we've shared some tips how to include all the professional information on your book blog and now we're moving to widgets, another great way of presenting your writings... read how to add social media widgets to your BookLikes webpage

 

 

BookLikes How-to: Advanced Shelving Options

If you still have any doubts how to +Shelf your books on BookLikes the following guest post should dispel all your doubts... read how to use +Shelf Advanced on BookLikes

 

 

Giveaways: win free books and give your titles away

If you have books to spare, want to promote and popularize you titles, give your books a second reading life, please do! With the giveaway program you can give the titles away as well as win ARCs and review copies right now... read how to add a giveaway and how to win review copies

 

 

BookLikes How-to: Housekeeping! or, Using the Mass Post Editor

If you’re a BookLikes veteran or new to BookLikes but with a huge import of data, you might, like me, look back at all of that history and think “I really need to clean some of those posts up” or “shoot, I wish I’d been using ‘x’ tag on all of those posts”, but then you imagine actually doing it, shudder to yourself, and find that sorting out your sock drawer suddenly sounds exciting.

 

OR, like I’ve been doing lately, you’ve gone to tag a post, see the mile long list of previously used tags and think to yourself “WHY do I have all those tags?... read how to do a clean up on your BookLikes blog 

 

BookLikes How to: book search tips

Searching books isn't always a piece of cake, especially with a never-ending virtual bookshelf and a catalog with multiple editions. Jenn, to the rescue with some handy tips for all BookLikers! ... read how to find a book on BookLikes

 

 

It's time for a reading challenge!

Some of you have already completed your 2017 reading challenge - big congratulations! This year is coming to an end but the reading challenge post will come in handy for your upcoming reading year. 

Remember that the next year is also about You and your books! Give yourself a me time with a new year reading resolution... read how to start a reading challenge

 

 

You can find more tutorial blog posts when you write tutorial in the search box and click Tags or simply click HERE

Girl With All the Gifts - audio review

The Girl with All the Gifts - M.R. Carey, Finty Williams

 

Melanie takes the reader on an exciting, suspenseful, and unexpected journey that explores the meaning of what it is to be human.

 

There are surprises that I don't want to give away, but let me say this book is an amazing read that you shouldn't miss.

""It's not natural for women to fight."
"It's not natural for someone to be as stupid as he is tall, and yet there you stand.""
Six of Crows - Leigh Bardugo

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Six of Crows Duology - review

Crooked Kingdom: A Sequel to Six of Crows - Leigh Bardugo Six of Crows - Leigh Bardugo

No mourners.

No funerals.

 

 

Kaz and his friends will keep you wondering how they can possibly survive his next brilliant (yet crazy) scheme, even as you are falling in love with these flawed and complex characters.

 

These books were amazing and fantastic. I can't wait to read The Grisha Trilogy that started this universe. 

Hold Tight - review

Hold Tight - Scott Brick, Harlan Coben

 

I listened to the audio of this book. The narrator was a bit annoying at times. I didn't really like his style. The story was okay, a bit dated maybe. The characters had blackberries instead of iPhones, GPS technology was brand new, and teenagers were on MySpace. The old tech was a bit distracting. It was interesting to think about how much easier it is for police as well as regular citizens to track people and find evidence using electronic means. 

 

The parents are worried about their son because his friend committed suicide and he is shutting them out. So, they decide to put software on his computer so they can track every keystroke he makes. This, of course, leads to them finding out things they can't explain. And then their son disappears. There is also a man killing people, but we don't know exactly why until much later.

 

I liked the way the book brought together multiple plot lines as the story progressed. But it was more than a bit slow at times. In the end, it was just okay.

I'll Give You the Sun - review

I'll Give You the Sun - Jandy Nelson

 

Noah and Jude are twins, and both very artistically inclined. This book follows the twins through some difficult times. It jumps back and forth between years and alternates between Noah and Jude's viewpoints.

 

This book deals with a lot of issues that teens might face, including questioning their sexuality, sex, death, divorce, mental health, and more. I didn't love the book, maybe because I don't usually enjoy realistic fiction. I read it for my Young Adult Literature class, and I probably wouldn't have picked it myself. But I am trying to branch out a bit.

 

Anyway, the book is well written and I can see the appeal it has for young adults. They can easily identify with the characters even if their own situation is a bit different. What bothers me about some of these stories is the romantic relationships. Books like this promote unrealistic expectations about love and relationships. Most of us don't find our "soulmate" (if one even exists), and we don't often experience a love that was "meant to be." Sad I know, but it seems worse to make teens think that this is how love works. 

Wintergirls - review

Wintergirls - Laurie Halse Anderson

 

Wow. This book is relentless, intense, and depressing...

That being said, it also seems realistic. It chronicles Lia's descent into anorexia and self-harm. Her best friend was bulemic and has died at the beginning of the book. She tried to call Lia multiple times on the night she died, but Lia didn't answer. The guilt Lia feels contributes to her decline. She has been in and out of treatment and knows how to fool the system. Her mother, father, and stepfather don't know how to reach her or what to do to help her anymore. How do you help someone who is determined to hurt themselves?

 

This book is a difficult read and not for the faint of heart. I didn't enjoy it at all, but I did learn from it and I do see the value in it. Thus my 3 star review. Anderson describes what Lia looks like and what she does to her body in graphic detail. So, beware.

 

I think this could be a good book for teens or their parents to read. Teens may see themselves and see hope or realize what could happen to them. Adults can see the pressures that today's teens face on a daily basis. I think books about these issues are important when they show the whole situation in a realistic light. Anderson does an amazing job of getting inside Lia's head and showing us her thought process.

Reading progress update: I've listened 416 out of 784 minutes.

The Girl with All the Gifts - M.R. Carey, Finty Williams

 

 

I'm reading (listening) to this book for The Dead Will Walk space. I'm really enjoying it. Several people recommended it, but I kept putting off reading it.

Thank you Halloween Bingo!

Bingo Call: 10/23

Reblogged from Moonlight Reader:

 

The dead will walk: basically, zombies

 

 

This One Summer

This One Summer - Jillian Tamaki, Mariko Tamaki

 

Rose and Windy have been coming to the same beach every summer for years. Rose is a bit older and is starting to change into a young woman while Windy is still a girl. They have a sisterly relationship and enjoy their summers together. Rose is experiencing family strife and trying to figure out who she is as a young woman. Windy is still happy-go-lucky. 

 

This graphic novel is based in summer fun, but there are a lot of serious issues going on here. Rose's parents are dealing with infertility and loss. The young man who works at the local store may have gotten his girlfriend pregnant. The older kids curse and talk about sex. This is not a story for younger readers. I think the appropriate age depends on your individual beliefs, but I would say high school.

 

I found the hyperness of Windy a bit irritating and I didn't love the book. But I can see that it is well-written and will appeal to many teens and young adults. I read this book for my Young Adult literature class. :)

Andromeda Strain - audiobook

The Andromeda Strain - David Morse, Michael Crichton

 

 

Wow. What can I say about this book? It was soooo boring. So much scientific jargon, military times and reports, stuff that I think I could have glossed over if I was doing the reading. But, listening to the audiobook, the narrator reads every word and I can't really skip over them. I will admit I lost focus from time to time. I really tried, but I just couldn't do it.

 

I've seen many positive reviews about this book and I purchased it on sale. I was really looking forward to a creepy, deadly, alien organism invasion story. In the end, I'm not really sure how the story ended. It was sort of a letdown. I am planning to watch the movie and see if taking all the superfluous stuff out helps.

 

Anyway, it was fairly short and I was anxious to finish it, so there's that. I read this for the Aliens square because the organism was alien in origin (at least I think it was).

Always good to know the best search methods...

BookLikes How to: book search tips

Reblogged from BookLikes:

 

Searching books isn't always a piece of cake, especially with a never-ending virtual bookshelf and a catalog with multiple editions. Jenn, to the rescue with some handy tips for all BookLikers! 

 

-- A guest post by Jenn, Murder by Death

 

The first and best way to find a title in the book database is to search by ISBN (or ASIN).  There are a couple of benefits to using ISBN for searching:  it will find the edition you have in your hand, and if it isn’t in the database, searching by ISBN/ASIN will kick off an import of the book, saving you all the work of having to either add it yourself, or asking a librarian to add it for you.

 

(Tip:  If you search by ISBN and multiple entries of the same title come up, let a librarian know by filing a book report.  That way they can merge the multiple records into one correct edition.)

 

Sometimes you don’t have the ISBN/ASIN handy, or the book is too old to have one.  Then it’s helpful to know a few tips about how to get the most out of BookLikes search.

 

Note: there are two search fields covered in today’s tips:  the BookLikes database, which is the field at the top right corner of the BookLikes pages, and the search field on your shelf page, which only searches the books you’ve shelved and has a different set of rules.

 

 

Searching the BookLikes book database

 

Generally, searching by title is very straightforward, especially for unusual titles, like The Maul and the Pear Tree, but the infinite variety of titles guarantees that some will work better than others without having to tweak how you search. 

 

Partial titles work. If they’re unusual enough.  So using The Maul and the Pear Tree, I can get away with searching The Maul and, although just searching The Maul is not enough: 

 

 

 

Articles A / An / The are optional:  UNLESS it’s a really common title.  So while The Wychford Poisoning Case and Wychford Poisoning Case will both return the book I’m looking for, if I try to search for A Shock to the System by Simon Brett, I’m better off including that A. 

 

 

 

 

Special characters:  The book database search is pretty forgiving overall (see note below) when it comes to &, apostrophes, commas, non-english alpha characters etc.  So searching for Mr. Pottermack’s Oversight will work as well as Mr Pottermacks Oversight, although the number of results returned might vary.    

 

 

 

Likewise, searching Jo Nesbø will return results for Jo Nesbo and vice versa.

 

(Note: there are some exceptions for non-english characters; when in doubt, try both.  This also holds true for the ampersand [&]; while I generally find it is interchangeable with ‘and’ there have been exceptions, so it’s always good to try both.)

 

 

When you’re getting too many results and none of them are the book you’re looking for.

 

Let’s say I’m looking for Ten by Gretchen McNeil. This is like searching ‘cats’ on google.  It’s too common a word and I’m going to get results that look like this:

 

 

 

Of course searching Ten Gretchen McNeil works, but generally the less typing, the better.  With that in mind, I tweak the search so that it says Ten Gretchen. Now I get:

 

 

Ten McNeil also works, but gives us two results. It’s always better to use the least common words when you have the choice to do so.  So if you’re trying to find a title that’s likely to return a lot of results, using part or all of the author’s name too will find your book faster.

 

 

Omnibuses are omnipresent

Because the BL database searches for all records that match the words you searched for, omnibus editions, if they exist, will appear in the results.  So searching for Murder on the Orient Express will return the single title edition as well as any omnibuses that include it as part of the title.   Most of the time the single edition title will appear at the top, but sometimes the omnibuses will overtake them and you’ll have to do a bit of scrolling.

 

 

PLEASE NOTE:  At the time of this writing, books that have been published under different titles in different countries and tied/combined together in the system can only be found by one of the titles (the ‘main’ one).  For example, Agatha Christie’s book Lord Edgware Dies was published in the US as Thirteen at Dinner.  As it’s the same book, they’re combined under Lord Edgware Dies.  This means that, at present, a search for Thirteen at Dinner only turns up omnibuses that contain that story.  This is a bug and it has been reported to BookLikes.  In the meantime, if you can’t find your book and you know of an alternate title, try searching by that title.

 

 

 

Searching your shelves

 

The search function for your shelves (the field that sits atop your shelves instead of at the top right of the page) is an entirely different beast from the book database search and can be summed up briefly:  This is an EXACT MATCH search function.  If a title has apostrophes, commas or any other special characters and you don’t include them, the search won’t find your books.

 

This means if I’m trying to find The Devil’s Novice by Ellis Peters on my shelves and I type in The Devils Novice (no apostrophe), it’s going to return zero results. 

 

How to get around this:  I either have to include all the punctuation in the title OR just search for a part of the title.  So searching Novice (or novice - it’s not case sensitive) will bring up my shelved book.  Other searches that will work include:  Devil (because it will search partial words), and Ellis Peters although these will return multiple results.

 

Note: you cannot use partial words combined with additional terms:  Devil Ellis or Devil Ellis Peters does NOT work; partial words must be used alone.

 

The best rule of thumb for searching your shelves is, unless you know the EXACT name of the book, stick to a few words of the title: Miss Peregrine instead of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children.  The shorter the search terms (while still keeping them effective) the smaller the margin of error.

 

Still not finding your book?

  1. Is it spelled right? It’s always worth double checking, as BL doesn’t have “did you mean” functionality.  If the book has been published under an alternate title and you know it, try searching by that title instead and then looking under “other editions” on the book page.
  2. Search by ISBN/ASIN: if it’s not in the system, it will be by the time the search finishes.
  3. If there’s no ISBN/ASIN on the book, try searching by author; sometimes a record will have the wrong language setting, keeping it from appearing in the results.
  4. Add the book. If it’s still nowhere to be found, please consider taking the time to add the book to the database so that it will be there when the next reader comes looking.

 

 

Have you had a particularly challenging time trying to find a book?  If so, please share it in the comments below; sometimes a title needs some special love from the librarians (bad imports leaving languages out, etc), or someone else might have a tip to make those searches work better.

 

Happy BookLiking!

Halloween Bingo Card update 5

Now if I could only catch up on my reading, I could have a Bingo. I have so much reading for school lately, I can't keep up. :(

This weekend I may just have to withdrawal from real life to catch up on reading. :)

 

 

Called squares not yet read: Tombstone

Read squares not yet called: BOO!

Squares called & read: Both

 

 

Calls:

9/1      Ghost

9/3      Cozy Mystery (Not on my card)

9/5      In the Dark, Dark Woods

9/7      Genre: Horror

9/9      Locked Room Mystery (Not on my card)

9/11    Murder Most Foul (Not on my card)

9/13   Witches

9/15   Werewolves

9/17   Modern Masters of Horror

9/19   Terrifying Women

9/21   Diverse Voices

9/23   Haunted Houses

9/25  Serial/Spree Killer

9/27  Terror in a Small Town

9/29  Aliens

10/1  Darkest London

10/3  Gothic

10/5  80's Horror

10/7  Classic Noir (Not on my card)

10/9  Chilling Children

10/11 Magical Realism

 

 

Books read:

Free Space (Creepy Raven): Castle Hangnail

Ghost: Heart-Shaped Box

Genre: Horror: Bird Box

In the Dark, Dark Woods: Suicide Forest

Witches: Forsaken

Vanishing Coin

The Vanishing Coin [The Magic Shop Book 1] - Magician Mike Lane, Kate Egan, Eric Wight

 

I finished reading this to the students today. When I asked if they liked the book, 15 out of the 18 said yes. Their favorite part overall was the magic tricks. They liked when Mike performed the tricks, but they also liked that the book contained instructions for them to learn the tricks too. Next week we are having a magic show, discussing the book, making flyers to help promote the book, and picking our next read.

 

This book is part of a series of books revolving around Mike. He is a smart kid but has difficulty focusing and thinks he isn't good at anything. Then he discovers the White Rabbit and its proprietor, Mr. Zerlin. Mike finds out that he is good at something after all, magic.

 

This book is sure to be a winner with young readers. Many kids love magic and learning magic tricks. Also, many kids will see shades of themselves in this book. Kids often get distracted or have difficulty focusing, and this book allows them to see that it happens to other kids too. It doesn't make them stupid, they just need to find their own kind of magic.

What a great idea to make Halloween more fun for all kids. :)

Teal Pumpkin Project '17- Bringing Awareness and Learning about Children w/ food allergies

Reblogged from Rane Aria :

 

 

    This is my fourth year supporting this project that's close to my heart, in four years  (Wow, time sure flies!) I've seen more big stores like HEB and Michaels offer ideas and pre-made teal pumpkins ideas.

 

 It's real simple : provide non-food treats for trick-or-treaters and paint a pumpkin teal to place in front of your home with a free printable sign from FARE, to indicate you have non-food treats on hand.

 

Teal Pumpkin Project

FARE Blog

 

Making Halloween fun and safe for everyone!

Bingo Call: 10/7

Reblogged from Moonlight Reader:

 

Classic noir: A subgenre of mystery that includes authors such as Dashiell Hammett, James Cain, Raymond Chandler and Cornell Woolrich. Anything that also qualifies as "hard-boiled" will work for this square.

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2017 Reading Challenge

Reading is my Escape has read 6 books toward her goal of 100 books.
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